R1150R BMW Integral ABS 1 (iABS1) Removal

This section is dedicated to the new Rockster version of the R1150R.

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R1150R BMW Integral ABS 1 (iABS1) Removal

Postby sweatmark » Tue Mar 18, 2008 3:46 pm

UPDATED 2011 March

DISCLAIMER
ANY ALTERATIONS TO ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT SYSTEMS MAY VOID WARRANTY AND POSE SERIOUS SAFETY RISKS OR DEATH. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY AND ALL MODIFICATIONS PERFORMED ON YOUR VEHICLE.


Removing the BMW Integral ABS 1 system (iABS1-"ectomy") is fairly simple and can be inexpensively implemented. I've ridden many thousands of miles following iABS1 removal, without problem or complaint. Having owned and ridden a factory non-ABS R1150R Roadster for several years, I was already familiar with the performance of the non-anti-lock brakes, and very satisfied with BMW's Evo braking system (calipers, brake discs, and master cylinders). Converting 2004 iABS1 Rockster to non-ABS has simplified maintenance and potentially enhanced long-term reliability.

Owners of R1150R, R1150RT, R1150GS, and R1100S bikes have completed the iABS1 removal process and report good results. The iABS1 bikes include R1150** variants, along with some early K1200 bikes and even a few R1200 hexheads. Sometime in 2006 the BMW Integral ABS 2 system (iABS2) was introduced, with a simpler non-servo system (no "power brakes" effect), lower unit replacement cost, lighter weight, and improved performance per BMW literature:

https://www.press.bmwgroup.com/pressclub/p/us/pressDetail.html?outputChannelId=9&id=T0017660EN_US&left_menu_item=node__2295

Background

It's easy to appreciate the utility and wisdom of ABS on streetbikes. There are many anecdotes here on the Roadster board and elsewhere describing how the BMW iABS system saved equipment and lives. But after riding my iABS1-equipped Rockster, I quickly grew to dislike and distrust the iABS1 power brakes implementation. Even more so, the possibility of iABS unit failure and US$2500 cost of replacement (2008 cost) prompted the idea of "ABS-ectomy" for my Rockster, and I took the plunge in 2008 after the bike's warranty had expired.

Image

My local BMW Motorrad dealer had this OE parts assortment displayed near the service desk for many years. There was good reason they chose to include the iABS1 servo modulator... a mission critical module for sale as replacement part, only $2600+. The sad fact of too frequent iABS1 system failure - plus power brakes lacking any "feel" - prompted my proactive ABS-ectomy project. Note also the F800 fuel pump assembly... another infamous BMW quality failure.

Required Parts

Purchased for Rockster conversion:
Image

1. non-ABS front brake circuit "Y-connector"
2. new banjo bolts
3. new crush washers
4. bleed screws & caps
5. non-ABS rear brake line

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3353.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3356.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3357.jpg

*Linked photobucket album instead of posting all the pics here on Roadster board in order to keep downloads manageable.

Please note that for Rockster conversion, only the y-piece, one banjo bolt, a few crush washers, and a bleeder+cap were actually required to complete the non-ABS plumbing. The original ABS-spec rear brake line works just fine on the Rockster, and I could have saved US$60+ for a new brake line. Banjo bolt was required because I stripped out original during removal. Bleeder was required because I decided to change out the OE pressure bleeder fitting.


Procedure

1. Remove seat and fuel tank, disconnect the battery
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3295.jpg

FYI - YouTube vid that shows tank removal in case you've never done so before:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXbNYhDNpkg

Please be careful with fuel line quick-connects (QCs) if your bike is so equipped. On day of my ABS-ectomy, one of my plastic male QCs failed to release, broke in half, causing fuel spill:
Image

With tank off you can look at iABS1 system and reconsider the value of ABS... is it worth $2500 to you for failed unit replacement? Answer might be yes or no.
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3319.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3321.jpg

2. Drain all the brake fluid
While you cannot easily drain the fluid inside the iABS1 module nor the steel lines running to front/rear brakes, you should definitely drain as much fluid as possible from master cylinders and connection hoses. Remember that brake fluid is nasty stuff.

3. Remove iABS1 module (did you disconnect the battery?)

Start by disconnecting steel brake lines. Pull cap off connector:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3334.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3335.jpg

Pull out retainer clip in connector:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3336.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3337.jpg

The steel lines will now pull up & out of the connectors. Be ready to catch brake fluid drips.

Disconnect iABS1 fluid lever sensor wires:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3338.jpg

Disconnect iABS1 wiring harness and giant proprietary AMP plug:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3339.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3340.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3341.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3342.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3343.jpg
Image

Remove three (3) bolts that attach iABS1 module mount bracket to battery tray:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3365.jpg
There are two fasteners on right side, and one on left side.

The iABS1 module can now be removed.
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3366.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3369.jpg
Image

4. Install new plumbing hardware - front brake circuit

Disconnect brake lines at original ABS distribution piece located at right side of front subframe. I don't have a pic of this, but you're probably staring at it now if your fuel tank has been removed.

Rebuild front brake circuit using the new y-piece:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3361.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3362.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3363.jpg
Image

Note that bike's wiring bundle rests on top of the bleed screw installed at top of y-piece. I added some protective tape around the wiring to prevent wiring damage. If desired, you could retain the original pressure-bleed fitting (with internal grub screw) and install at the top location of y-piece.

Check all plumbing connections, add brake fluid, and bleed front brakes. The R1150** front brake circuit is a pain to bleed. Use favorite technique/bleeder and you will eventually get solid lever feel.

5. Install new plumbing hardware - rear brake circuit

Actually, there's no new hardware aside from new crush washer, as long as you retain original rear brake line and avoid stripping out the banjo bolt. I can only confirm re-use of the R1150R's original ABS-spec rear brake line for non-ABS conversion; if you have a different R1150**, R1100S, or K-bike, then check the available length of the ABS-spec rear brake line.

See photobucket notes for each of the following rear brake circuit pics:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3346.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3347.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3348.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3349.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3350.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3351.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3358.jpg
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i269/sweatmark/ABSectomy/IMG_3359.jpg
Image

Check all plumbing connections, add brake fluid, and bleed rear brake.

6. End of plumbing changes. Celebrate responsibly.


Electrical

The iABS1 controller manages the brake lever + pedal switch circuits, along with the brake lamp and tail lamp. The controller also connects to the two ABS warning lamps (triangle "!", and "ABS"), with the latter operated via a normally-closed (NC) relay in the fusebox. For some bike applications (R1100S, Rockster, maybe some K-bikes), the iABS1 module also converts the rear wheel speed ABS sensor signal into a signal that drives the speedometer/odometer. When you remove the iABS1 module, you need to address the circuit requirements by either retaining the iABS1 controller board, or creating needed circuit support.

Your options for ABS-ectomy electrical work depend on year/model of bike, status of your old iABS1 module, and comfort level with electrics.

Option A - retain the iABS1 controller board.

This is the simplest option if your iABS1 module is hydraulically kaputt but electrically functional. All that's required is a module hack like this guy did:

http://jpramondon.blogspot.com/2010/05/abs-removal-epilogue-hopefully.html

Aside from dissecting the iABS module and sealing up the ABS controller box, all you need to do is pull the "ABS" lamp relay and defeat the "!" warning lamp (remove bulb).

Option B - build necessary circuits.

If your iABS1 controller circuit is fried, or if you decide to remove a serviceable module and sell it for beer money, then add-on circuitry is needed to replace the iABS1 controller's electrical functions.

Here's how the electrical part of the iABS1 removal varies according to bike:

R1150R Roadster, R1150GS, R1150RT, some others

These bikes use conventional speedometer drive on front wheel, so all you have worry about is the brake switch/lamp connections. Other intrepid iABS1-ectomizers have purchased BMW front/rear non-ABS-spec OE switches for their projects, but being a cheap a$$, I decided to keep the original ABS-spec switches and came up an idea for using a conventional 5-pin automotive relay to connect switches with brake lamp... the circuit is described later in this topic thread. "Works a treat" as the Brits say. The brake switch issue arises because ABS and non-ABS switches work in opposite fashion: non-ABS switches are normally-open (NO) circuits, while the ABS switches are normally-closed (conducting, NC) in order to provide the iABS1 controller a means to check each switch circuit via continuity during startup.

Here's the conventional brake switch setup:

Image

And here's how I was able to reuse the iABS1 brake switches following ABS-ectomy:

Image

For the wire and relay pin assignments, please check out my later posts within this thread.

R1100S, Rockster, some K-bikes

These models require new brake switch/lamp circuits AND some means of generating a speedometer signal. In another thread I'll cover modifications to make your speedo go.


PM me if you have questions.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The balance of this thread contains ramblings collected as project originally unfolded, plus updates as appropriate.
Last edited by sweatmark on Thu May 03, 2012 2:08 pm, edited 12 times in total.
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Tue Mar 18, 2008 3:49 pm

Some background (need to do some more web searching for additional info):

Recently got the BMW Motorrad wiring schematics DVD-rom and need to dive into the difference between ABS and non- bikes. My understanding is that brake light switch function is integrated into the Integral ABS unit, along with the bulb circuit checks. New brake light switches will be required front and rear.

R1150R.org ABS links:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=13461

ADV board ABS links:
gaspipe's R1100GSmoto build
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=69015
motozilla's R1150GSmoto kit infos
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=47229
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=52522
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=43759
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66841

Sport Touring ABS links:
(empty)
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby riceburner » Tue Mar 18, 2008 6:21 pm

I'd advise going for a completely new pair of hoses from the front m/c to the calipers - both hoses running directly from m/c to caliper - with no junction boxes or anything.

It's the way the R1100S boxer-cup bikes were setup and it's standard racing practise - you need a double-length banjo bolt for the m/c and it's very easy to setup. I have it on my ZXR400 and I can lift the rear wheel off the ground with 1 finger. ;)
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Wed Mar 19, 2008 11:33 am

Burner-

Yep, I'd love to simplify the front brake lines "a la sportbike de rigueur", but the standard SS brakeline kit configuration you describe is problematic for the R1150R.

Pondered the front brake line(s) configuration after talking with the Spiegler folks. For our Telelever R1150R bikes, the options for running brake lines are constrained by:

(1) the shape of the fuel tank and attached oil cooler "pods", especially WRT location of front brake master cylinder (m/c) at full right steering lock;
(2) the presence of the Telelever A-arm and the front shock.

Would love to go for the Less is More superbike solution of just two new brake lines that connect m/c (with double banjo bolt) to the calipers, but don't think it will work because of #1&2 above. The only way I could see that setup working is to run both lines from the m/c horizontally towards middle of the top triple clamp (well, "Telelever upper fork cross brace", but you know what I mean), and then down behind instrument podule to follow fork tubes towards calipers. If you crank handlebars back and forth while imaging binding of such a brakeline setup, you can see lots of contact points and potential for wear.

So, what I'm leaning towards:

(a) short length from front brake master to the BMW OE 3-way "distribution piece" (let's call it "3dp") that that attaches on RHS of front frame;
(b) brake switch in the master cylinder's banjo bolt;
(c) separate brake lines connecting 3dp to calipers;
(d) double banjo bolt at 3dp to make it happen;
(e) use existing bleeders at top of Evo calipers and top of the 3dp, as per non-ABS bikes - makes for easy brake system bleeding.

I also considered the common practice in streetfighter circles of running single line from m/c to one caliper, then use 2nd line to loop over towards the other caliper, but bleeding air from that looping line would be a PITA.

Looked over the front brake lines setup on our ABS and non-ABS bikes. Here's what we're starting with...

The Rockster has 4+ brake line segments, all stainless steel except for the hard pipe:
master cylinder to flare fittings;
flare fittings and lotsa ABS hard piping to ABS module and back);
flex line to three-port splitter on RHS;
short run to RHS caliper;
longer run to LHS caliper.

Non-ABS Roadster has the following, all in rubber for our '02 except as noted:
brakeline segment from m/c to the 3dp;
line from 3dp to three-port splitter on RHS;
short line from splitter to RHS caliper;
flared hard pipe section from splitter to LHS;
short line to LHS caliper.

The Rockster's SS lines will be transplanted to the Roadster, resulting in a simpler 4-segment brakeline configuration. Bought the required non-ABS SS line for the rear brake to match, since the ABS rear brakeline is different. Hey, only the best for Mrs. Sweatmark!
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Tue Apr 08, 2008 12:30 am

OK- latest & greatest.

(1) Received some BMW parts for non-ABS system: rear brake SS line, the front brake line 3-port connector, banjo bolts, bleed valve & cover.

(2) Maybe more importantly, dug into the BMW electrical system CD-rom I bought for gazillion dollars to investigate the Rockster's ABS circuitry. Based on initial impressions and groundless optimism, the electrical portion of the ABS-ectomy could be much simpler than originally envisioned.
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby iowabeakster » Tue Apr 08, 2008 11:20 pm

Thanks for giving all of us the ability to see this in progress. Much appreciated. =D>

Based on initial impressions (and groundless optimism), the electrical portion of the ABS-ectomy could be much simpler than originally envisioned.


Are you saying that the brake light switches/wiring will remain as stock?
I was dreaming when I wrote this, forgive me if it goes astray...
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Wed Apr 09, 2008 10:23 pm

Are you saying that the brake light switches/wiring will remain as stock?


Yes. The iABS bikes do not have conventional normally-open brake switches located front and rear. Instead, the iABS switches are normally-closed (NC) circuits that allow the iABS controller to fault check each circuit (along with the brake and tail lamps) as part of iABS startup process. I found a way to re-use the iABS brake switches and save some money, as described later in this thread.

The following tables show the wiring assignments for connections to the iABS module harness:

Image

Image

Key for German-English color codes:
BL blue
BR briwn
GE yellow
GN green
RT red
SW black
WS white
VI violet


This information was sourced from BMW Electrical Schematics CD-rom purchased from my local dealership.
<edit - after several years, I'd still say the CD-rom was money well spent>

Here's snippet of the info from the CD-rom: (will not post complete info due to copyright)

Image
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Wed Apr 09, 2008 10:28 pm

<edit 2011 - more old nonsense deleted>
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby csalt » Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:01 am

Sweatmark,
The rear anti-lock sensor on my 04 doubles as a speed sensor. Was wondering if the signal went to the abs brain or was processed elsewhere. I like my brakes but would go your route if big money failure happened. Keep the progress posted. Thanx
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Thu Apr 10, 2008 2:39 pm

The rear anti-lock sensor on my 04 doubles as a speed sensor. Was wondering if the signal went to the abs brain or was processed elsewhere.


csalt-

Based on the wiring schematic, the wheel speed sensor signals route to the ABS module, then to the instruments. I don't have an oscilloscope to check the signal from ABS module to speedo, so must hold breath until the jumpers are in place and bike's on the road.
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Wed May 28, 2008 12:48 pm

Other BMW Integral ABS 1 references:

http://advwisdom.hogranch.com/Wisdom/
http://www.ukgser.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1342017
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=324431

Note that some aspects of the ABS-ectomy are not fully documented or determined (e.g. switch options and rear brake line), per the ADV commentary.

Found somewhere else online:

Integral ABS 1 applications:

BMW Motorcycles R 1100 S 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
BMW Motorcycles R 1150 Adventure 01 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
BMW Motorcycles R 1150 GS 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003
BMW Motorcycles R 1150 R 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006
BMW Motorcycles R 1150 R Rockster 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
BMW Motorcycles R 1150 RS 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
BMW Motorcycles R 1150 RT 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006
BMW Motorcycles R 1200 C 2002, 2003, 2004
BMW Motorcycles R 1200 C Indep. 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
BMW Motorcycles R 1200 CL 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
BMW Motorcycles R 1200 Montauk 2002, 2003, 2004


<edit 2012 - removed the ADV quoted text, just follow link to the excellent resource>
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Fri Jun 27, 2008 11:10 am

Bumping this up - will tackle this on July 4th or following weekend. On the workbench:

Image

Riceburner, did you install the superbike 2-segment brakelines? I'm starting with the OE brakeline setup, but will consider an aftermarket set later. The R1200R front brakeline NHTS recall thing makes me wonder about best routing of a superbike setup... that's why I'm starting with the original plumbing.
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby riceburner » Sat Jun 28, 2008 5:01 am

sweatmark wrote:Bumping this up - will tackle this on July 4th or following weekend. On the workbench:

Image

Riceburner, did you install the superbike 2-segment brakelines? I'm starting with the OE brakeline setup, but will consider an aftermarket set later. The R1200R front brakeline NHTS recall thing makes me wonder about best routing of a superbike setup... that's why I'm starting with the original plumbing.



Yes, I did.
So far no issues whatsoever. :) (I think I documented it somewhere here - but can't remember). Will take some more pics at some point.

I did learn one VERY important thing that will be of use to you.

The Front brake light SWITCH is mounted the other way around in the circuitry on ABS bike as opposed to non-ABS. IE on the ABS bikes the switch is CLOSED (ie it MAKES a circuit) when the brakes are OFF. This is a failsafe of sorts I think. When you grab the brakes the the circuit is BROKEN and the electrics in the ABS box turn the rear brake light ON, and start monitoring the wheels speeds.

On non-ABS bikes the circuit is the other way round - a much simpler continuous circuit is MADE by the switch CLOSING as you pull the brake lever.


oh - btw - do NOT split the callipers! ;) (unless you replace the internal seals - which BMW won't sell to you)
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Sat Jun 28, 2008 10:07 pm

The Front brake light SWITCH is mounted the other way around in the circuitry on ABS bike as opposed to non-ABS. IE on the ABS bikes the switch is CLOSED (ie it MAKES a circuit) when the brakes are OFF.


Burner,

Agreed - very important difference between the ABS and non- R1150* bikes. But I think I've got this ABS-specific switch peculiarity covered... the ADV and UKGSers discussed this issue, with the few reported ABS-removals simply buying the BMW OE non-ABS front and rear brake switches. Where's the sport in that?!
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby riceburner » Mon Jun 30, 2008 4:48 am

sweatmark wrote:
The Front brake light SWITCH is mounted the other way around in the circuitry on ABS bike as opposed to non-ABS. IE on the ABS bikes the switch is CLOSED (ie it MAKES a circuit) when the brakes are OFF.


Burner,

Agreed - very important difference between the ABS and non- R1150* bikes. But I think I've got this ABS-specific switch peculiarity covered... the ADV and UKGSers discussed this issue, with the few reported ABS-removals simply buying the BMW OE non-ABS front and rear brake switches. Where's the sport in that?!



Ironically of course you can't actually change the micro-switch in the leer assembly - because the LEVER MOUNTING assembly controls the orientation of the switch - to change the "throw" of the micro-switch at the front brake lever you have to get hold of a new master-cylinder-reservoir part!
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby mhsilverw » Mon Jun 30, 2008 12:49 pm

Hi,

I am trying to follow this, didn't quite follow the last post. Are you saying you can't use the switches from a non-ABS bike on the handle-bar and foot pedal lever ends? :oops:

Out of curiosity when the hydraulics are changed and the brake lights - assuming this can be done - are there anyother electrical 'gremlins' lurking out there? if the SERVO/ABS unit is disconnected is there no failsafe that would stop the bike working? :?

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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Mon Jun 30, 2008 1:12 pm

Ironically of course you can't actually change the micro-switch in the lever assembly


Good point, and all the more reason to configure the no-longer-ABS electrics without changing the brake switches (and corresponding brake master parts). The BMW R1150R ABS schematic actually shows the normally-closed brake switches, though you can't see it in this crappy mobile phone picture:

Image

My iABS1-ectomy brake/tail/switch circuit solution is simple: use a 5-pin automotive relay. The 5-pin relays have both normally-open (NO) and normally-closed (NC) terminals that can take advantage of the iABS brake switches' NC design. Since the ABS brake switches are NC and conducting, and each switch's circuit is captured in the iABS1 connector, the hand and foot brake switch circuits can be connected in series to drive the 5-pin relay such that the Normally Open (NO) pin 87 can power the taillight*, and Normally Closed (NC) pin 87A can supply the brake lamp. When either/both brake switch is actuated, the hand+foot switches series circuit will open (stop conducting), moving relay to the NC position and light the brake lamp filament. Here's a bad picture of a poor circuit sketch on a dirty napkin:

Image

<edit 2011 - *Just for grins, I used the 5-pin relay's NO/NC pins to actuate tail and brake lamp for Rockster, which means that only one of the bulbs is lit at any given time; for R1150RT applications and possible others that use tail lamp to illuminate the license plate, you should following the schematic below to ensure tail lamp remains lit at all times via power through Fuse 2>

The BMW relays in the fuse panel are all 4-pin... I bought one of each type to confirm the pinouts (and now have expensive backups for too rare a failure); BMW relays were something like US$20- each. The generic 5-pin 30Amp automotive relay I purchased cost about US$5bucks and is widely available. Amperage rating for such a relay is based on the NO circuit, with the NC pin handling about half the rated Amps, which is still overkill for the R1150R brake lamp filament that draws less than 3Amps.

The ABS electrical connector also carries fused power from Fuse 2, so the tail/brake lamp circuit is isolated to this fuse for troubleshooting and repairs.

<edit 2011 - added the following schematic as prepared for someon's UK R1150RT iABS-removal project>

Image


I am trying to follow this, didn't quite follow the last post. Are you saying you can't use the switches from a non-ABS bike on the handle-bar and foot pedal lever ends?


Yes, you can use the switches from non-ABS R1150** bikes, but I cannot personnaly attest to potential fitment problems. The good news is that you don't have to change the brake switches from what's on your ABS-equipped bike... or I don't think it's necessary.

Out of curiosity when the hydraulics are changed and the brake lights - assuming this can be done - are there anyother electrical 'gremlins' lurking out there?


Based on the BMW Electrical Schematics CD-rom, there is no electrical/logic connection between the motor and brake computers. So, when you say "... is there no failsafe that would stop the bike working?", if you mean some type of logic signal that would impact engine operation if something should happen to brake system, then the answer is -thankfully- NO. ABS or non-ABS status is invisible to the ECU.
Last edited by sweatmark on Thu Mar 17, 2011 1:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby riceburner » Wed Jul 02, 2008 8:35 am

sweatmark wrote:Bumping this up - will tackle this on July 4th or following weekend. On the workbench:

Image

Riceburner, did you install the superbike 2-segment brakelines? I'm starting with the OE brakeline setup, but will consider an aftermarket set later. The R1200R front brakeline NHTS recall thing makes me wonder about best routing of a superbike setup... that's why I'm starting with the original plumbing.



Some pics here (the later ones) of the layout I used for putting on 2 simple lines (direct m/c -> caliper).

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rockburner ... 626780985/
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby sweatmark » Wed Jul 02, 2008 12:56 pm

Burner - thanks for the link to your superbike brake line installation pics. Looks good. "Less is More", a credo to live by!
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Re: R1150R ABS-ectomy

Postby riceburner » Thu Jul 03, 2008 3:44 am

sweatmark wrote:Burner - thanks for the link to your superbike brake line installation pics. Looks good. "Less is More", a credo to live by!



The other good thing about them is that there's very little "wear" opportunities - apart from the movement due to suspension there's no movement of the hoses relative to the fork legs when steering (because it's all on the same side of the hinge now) - so the hoses won't wear the finish on anything - unlike the normal setup. :)
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